Pokemon Gone

rattata

On Android Authority’s “Pokemon Go fever is dying off“:

Well, it was fun while it lasted, but the latest data seems to indicate that the latest poke-craze is already on its way out. A variety of app and market intelligence firms are reporting that Pokemon Go usership is starting to fade away.

That’s what happens when people already had enough Rattatas, Spearows, and Pidgeys.

The iPhone experience is beyond specs sheets

galaxy-note-7

I was at the mall yesterday and I was looking through the new Samsung Galaxy Note 7 on display. Personally, I found it so gorgeous that I kept thinking to myself how come I’m still sticking with the iPhone when the Samsung Galaxy series of phones (and even Android for that matter) have gone a long way since I last owned a Samsung Galaxy S2.

But then, later in the evening, I found this video: Continue reading

The Smartphone Dominion

smartphones

There are a lot of metrics to measure smartphone dominion among different smartphone brands and operating systems. Survey organizations use sales figures, net profit, internet traffic, apps ecosystem, etc., even broken down into different demographics and/or geography, to demonstrate the different systems’ leadership above the rest.

But, really, if you are going to be realistic about it, try going to restaurants, malls, and/or coffee shops around the metro, and observe which smartphones are predominantly in the hands of other people around you, you’ll find that these statistics are not quite accurate.

Instapaper for Android

After more than a month tinkering with my Android device, the Samsung Galaxy S II (SGS2), I’ve come to the conclusion that the one app I missed the most about my iPhone is Instapaper.

From the mail app, Evernote, Twitter (Tweetbot), Facebook, to Feeddler (Google Reader) apps, you can easily send articles to read later (and even offline) via Instapaper. Alternatives like ReadItLater are great, but seamless integration with various other apps are wanting, and some articles, although obviously blog posts themselves, are not loading properly in ReadItLater.

To a lot of people, owning a smartphone means a lot of games. I consider myself to not belong to that “lot of people”. The only games I have on my smartphones are those that are really quick games like, the usual suspects like Fruit Ninja, Fling, MasterCode, Flight Control, and some card games like Poker, to pass the time away while waiting for something or someone like in waiting areas of airports, clinics, offices, restaurants and meetings. Read Further »

How Do You Use Your Smartphones?

I use my Sony PS3 game console for playing video games; my 32″ LCD TV + DVD Player or media player for watching movies and TV series; my personal computer and/or mac for personal computing like spreadsheets, word processing, media-editing, browsing flash-heavy websites, etc.; my Canon 30D DSLR for photography; and my smartphone/s for mobile computing, communications (e.g., calling, SMS and email, IM), on-the-go social networking, and some light internet browsing.

That being said, I don’t use my smartphone primarily as (or as an eligible alternative for a great) game console, movie player, personal computer, or camera. Furthermore, if all you do is texting and calling for a phone, you don’t need a shiny new smartphone.

In the World of Smartphones, We Are But Just Fourth Class Citizens

It’s sad to say, but, in the world of smartphones, we — the Windows Mobile phone owners, are but just fourth class citizens.

When it comes to great games and useful utility applications for smartphones, it appears, according to my observation, that developers develop apps in the following order or priority or hierarchy:

  1. iPhone
  2. BlackBerry
  3. Android
  4. Windows Mobile
  5. Symbian S60
  6. Others

Continue reading