Let Us Opt Out of EMail Newsletters in One Click

If you are an internet service sending newsletters to email addresses, regardless of whether they were legitimately obtained, there should be a one-click unsubscribe link at the bottom of the message.

There are times when I sign up with an internet service, I just want to get over with all the check-marks and options at once just to “test out” the service. If I decide the service is not for me, I just ignore it and never come back. The problem is they already have my email address. And now they are regularly sending me newsletters I didn’t even want in the first place.

A good internet service places a quick unsubscribe/opt out link at the bottom of any message they send out to users. The bad ones, they put a footer message informing that you can opt out of their newsletter by logging in and changing your preferences from their website.

Unsubscribing should be a one click process (or two at the most). I can’t recall what my username and password were anymore (I use different passwords for different sites). So the quick remedy, I report it as spam.

And you know what happens when I report your message (thus, your email address) as spam in Gmail? The system will learn from that and may mark all your other messages to other Gmail users as spam as well.

Sparrow – What Makes a Mac a Mac

Apps like Sparrow Mail are what makes a Mac a Mac. Not just because it is available exclusively for Mac, but they integrate well with the Mac.

Sparrow is a desktop email client for Mac that works like a native desktop client especially for Gmail. It could even replicate most of the keyboard shortcuts of Gmail as you would do in a web browser. It’ll support IMAP for Yahoo! Mail as well. What’s more, email accounts other than Gmail will behave like Gmail inside Sparrow.

Watch the introductory video below:

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Gmail Conversation View On and Off

One of the great features of Google’s Gmail is its conversation or threaded view, which groups topics together, to enable the user to review at one glance how the conversation went through.

However, after about five years of enjoying this feature from Gmail, I’ve found some loopholes about it. When searching for a particular message, for example, that you either received or sent (the search function, by the way, within Gmail is yet another powerful feature that I love), you sometimes find yourself scrounging through long conversations to find that specific message or attachment that you needed.

And this is where this new option comes in handy.

Now you can turn the conversation view on and off from the settings page.

Got a suggestion, though, to the Gmail developers. Wish this option is just a click away, instead of embedding the same among the many options in the general settings, just like the quick options for turning chat on/off, google buzz on/off, older contact manager, and basic HTML at the bottom of the page (see below):

Gmail Rolls Out Google Buzz; Check Out What's in Store For Everyone

Here’s another great reason why you should love and totally switch (if you haven’t yet) to Gmail. They’ve recently rolled out their newest service, the Google Buzz. (By the way, Google is gradually rolling out Buzz to everyone, so if you don’t see it in your Gmail account yet, check back soon.)

Google Buzz Landing Preview

It’s basically like Twitter, but actually better. It allows comments, likes, email. It resides right within your Gmail web interface. All you need is a Gmail account. Of course, your friends should be using Gmail the same in order for you to share thoughts, quotes, links, photos, and videos with each other.

Photos and videos are displayed inline, so you don’t have to open another window or tab. Sharing can be done publicly (and displayed to your Google profile page) or privately to a group of people or close friends only.

Comments get sent right to your inbox so it’s easy to keep up with the conversation. Of course, you can mute a certain thread in case you find your inbox full of non-sense.

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POP3 Access for Yahoo! Mail Free Accounts

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A POP3 access allows you to send and receive your email messages from a desktop email client like Microsoft Outlook, Thunderbird, Entourage, etc. A user need not login to the web interface and face hundreds of banner ads everyday, but just wait till the program fetches the mails from the background.

POP3 access (and even IMAP) has always been free when you’re using a GMail account. However, by default, for Yahoo! Mail, you will need to upgrade to at least the Yahoo! Mail Plus account (yes, you have to pay in this case) in order to avail of the POP3 access.

Fortunately, there is a workaround for this: YPOPs! Continue reading

Gmail Chat Now Have Voice and Video Chat

Say hello to Gmail voice and video chat.

Gtalk, which is a desktop application for chatting and voice chat (as differentiated to Gmail chat, which is a built in chat function within Gmail), already used to offer voice chat.

This time, Gmail chat offers voice chat plus the VIDEO CHAT.

Now, Gmail chat surely is a great (and maybe even better) alternative to YM.

New Yahoo! Mail Email Addresses

You sure already have that username@yahoo.com Yahoo! email account, but that username is not really what you always wanted, because it was already taken when you signed up for your first Yahoo! account. You don’t want numbers like your birthday or combinations of your favorite numbers populating your email account either.

Now, this is your chance to grab that favorite username of yours. Yahoo! is offering two more domain names to associate with your user account, ymail and rocketmail. Same Yahoo! Mail technology, same inbox look, same storage space and spam protection. You can have that username@ymail.com and username@rocketmail.com, and transfer all your contacts from your previous Yahoo! account.

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Gmail + Thunderbird + Addons

The ultimate combination to suit your daily email needs. All these for the total price of nil –nada –nothing! Now, what more could you ask for?

Creating a gmail account is free. It offers pop and imap access (of course, imap will always be better than pop) to enable you to access your email and send messages using a desktop email client like Thunderbird (ditch Microsoft Outlook), as well as 6.5GB of message storage space (so far).

Mozilla Thunderbird is likewise free, created by the same creator of another internet tool and browser, Mozilla Firefox. Setting up Thunderbird to fetch and send gmail messages is easy. Just refer to this tutorial and you’re ready to go.

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