The WordPress Bloat — Ten Years Later

Dumitru Brinzan of ilovewp.com writes:

Currently WordPress powers over 60 million websites, that is an estimated ~33% of the Internet. Some of these websites are large websites with tens of thousands of content pages. But a vast majority of WordPress websites are run by regular people and small businesses, many of them with probably less than 20 pages of content.

Now imagine that these millions of WordPress websites rely on thousands upon thousands of files, hundreds of megabytes worth of scripts and libraries, just to output a few hundred of cached kilobytes of “Hello World” content.

This has been my predicament 10 years ago. If I thought WordPress was bloated back then, more so it is now! My suggestion: have a 1.) WordPress full install script and 2.) WordPress core (or call it WordPress Lite, if you will), taking away functionalities like Gutenberg, Custom Post Types and Formats, and Multi-Site support.

Dropbox – 3 Device Limit for Free Accounts

Dropbox is probably the first-mover in the cloud service business. That’s its primary advantage. Heck, I’d be bold to say that probably that’s its only advantage.

I was early to adopt the cloud syncing service. My free Dropbox account’s allowed storage has gone up to more than 18GB from referrals. Other services have sprung up ever since Dropbox. More importantly, Google got into the game with its Google Drive. Yet, I stuck with Dropbox because it was my first cloud service and they were doing a fine job at desktop syncing and backing-up my important files.

This week, though, I got a new office laptop. And I was surprised to discover that Dropbox is now limiting syncing up to 3 devices only, including mobile apps, for free accounts. The three devices limit would probably be enough for most people.

However, I’m not most people. Thus, I’d probably drop Dropbox soon and switch to Google Drive altogether. Even with paid storage upgrade, Google Drive is still much cheaper than Dropbox. The only thing that worries me are the apps that only have Dropbox integration as option (e.g. YNAB Classic).

Gutenberg is the WordPress Editor We Don’t Need!

I was surprised to find out when adding a new entry to one of my self-hosted WordPress blog that the back-end interface has totally changed. And it was not for the better. It was not at all intuitive. I hate it! I learned it was called Gutenberg.

Searching around, I understood why WordPress has to do this, WordPress wants to compete with the likes of Facebook and Twitter, where users simply upload a media, add some text, and go! While mobile, using touch.

If I want to do some quick posts, I’d do that on Facebook and/or Twitter. For lengthy texts and explanations, WordPress is the way to go. And I don’t need those pointless blocks that break in the first place to do that!

So please, WordPress, don’t ruin our experience. Stop using Gutenberg as the default editor in the self-hosted WordPress blogs, and don’t you dare remove the classic editor option here in WordPress.com.

A Call to Boycott Products on Youtube Ads

This is already getting out of hands. Every minute or so in the middle of playing Youtube videos on mobile, tablet, or through Chromecast, ads keep ruining my Youtube experience. How can one enjoy their favorite Youtube videos if a lot of ads keep popping up at irritating rate? I know, Youtube is free, but data isn’t. Imagine paying for data every time you watch advertisements.

I don’t actually mind seeing ads in-between every other video. But mid-video ads are really getting into my nerves. Make it appear as often rare as every 20 minutes. But not every minute or two!

Otherwise, what we do is either boycott Youtube altogether or boycott the products you’re trying to sell.

So, this goes to the likes of Nestogrow. Stop being too aggressive on Youtube ads. The more often your ads ruin our Youtube experience, the louder our call and hope that your products won’t sell!

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Gimbal Revolution

I bought a Zhiyun Smooth Q last year, and it now happily occupies a space in my bag. And it stayed there for quite some time now.

It was a great gimbal, don’t get me wrong, especially for its price. But I just don’t enjoy the trouble setting it up with my bulky Samsung Galaxy Note 8 everytime I use it. I’m sure it’s not too bulky a device to use for a planned event or travel, but not for everyday snap here and there.

And just recently, DJI released a new product — the DJI Osmo Pocket, and in time for the Christmas season at that.

And just like that, now I’m hooked.