Inaccurate maps in Android

Just to show you how problematic Android maps and geolocation can often be, I’ve tested the Google Maps app in the iPhone 5s and LG G2 using the same wifi network. And here’s the result.

This is what Android makes out of my current location: Check out the screenshots after the jump »

How to prioritize sharing options in Android

image

One of the selling points of an Android system is the ability to share about anything from any app. Apps that solicit sharing to, add their sharing shortcuts to the sharing window as you can see in the screenshot above.

There’s just one big problem. When the sharing options have too many services already, it becomes too crowded. You have to scroll down all the way down to share to say Twitter or Tumblr, because sharing services are alphabetically arranged. They’re not even arranged according to which service you usually use.

And yet, no settings to streamline these options. Or, I may be missing something. I’ll be glad if you can point me to the right direction.

Note: I’m currently using the LG G2 running on Android 4.2.2 Jelly Bean.

That BBM app is just a clutter in the notification drawer

When you open the BBM settings for Android, you’ll have the following option:

bbm-settings

It means that BBM has to persistently run in the background in order for it to get going and receive new messages. This is in contrast to how other instant messaging apps like Viber, WhatsApp, and WeChat are operating, and is because BBM ignored to use the Google Cloud Messaging service.

As a result — clutter in the notification bar and notification drawer: Check out the screeshot after the jump »

BBM for Android and iOS

bbm-messenger

BBM for Android and BBM for iPhone: Official Launch Details:

This is the news you’ve been waiting for! I am thrilled to tell you that we are about to officially resume our rollout of BBM for Android and iPhone customers around the globe! In the next few hours, people will start seeing BBM in Google Play, the App Store and in select Samsung App Stores – where it will be free to download.

The BBM server went bonkers after 7 million users signed up the first day BBM for iOS and Android went live on September 21, 2013. That’s 7 million BBM users, compared to Viber’s more than 200 million users — and still going strong. Enough said. Continue reading

The LG G2 QuickWindow — Great but not quite!

lg-g2-quick-window-case

If you’ve been following me on Twitter and on this blog, you’ll notice that I’m an Apple fan. I’ve had so many issues with Android before, especially with the Samsung Galaxy S2, when compared to the iPhone 4.

But the LG G2 is completely a different league from the S2. That’s why when it came out, I grabbed one for myself.

One of the selling points of the LG G2 is the QuickWindow feature when used with the LG’s own QuickWindow case. Android Central defines it as:

This latest iteration serves a couple purposes. First is to protect your phone. The QuickWindow Case is a thin shell that covers most of the G2 — and it does so with minimal thickness. It also protects most of the display, save for the window area. (That’s another change from similar covers — this window is wide open, no plastic between you and the display.) And, finally, it brings a bit of functionality to the display without having to open the cover.

But I have a few gripes about it that I hope LG can improve upon:
Continue reading

The Features Over and Above Android

Samsung recently released their new Galaxy S4 ad to demonstrate their features like Drama Mode, Air Gestures, Hover, among others. Check out the video below:

Personally, I believe these are the features that the Galaxy S4 owners would enjoy showing off to friends and ignore thereafter. They would hardly find real life applications for those features, especially when those are the same things that drain the batteries fast.

But of course, Samsung was wise enough to leave off the issues that plague their flagship phone, like overheating, unreliability of the system, slow recharging but fast discharging of the battery, involuntary system reboot, etc. That’s Android for you!

The Smartphone Dominion

smartphones

There are a lot of metrics to measure smartphone dominion among different smartphone brands and operating systems. Survey organizations use sales figures, net profit, internet traffic, apps ecosystem, etc., even broken down into different demographics and/or geography, to demonstrate the different systems’ leadership above the rest.

But, really, if you are going to be realistic about it, try going to restaurants, malls, and/or coffee shops around the metro, and observe which smartphones are predominantly in the hands of other people around you, you’ll find that these statistics are not quite accurate.

USSD Hack that Reset Samsung Touchwiz Devices

Yugatech:

The web hack is actually a malicious code that is hiding inside a web page and gets triggered when visited using the stock browser (except Google Chrome) of a TouchWiz-based phone. The malicious code then spawns the dialer and enters a bad USSD code with the sole purpose of nuking your device back to its factory default.

Now, if you fell victim to this hack, how you’d probably wish you had iTunes that have your data and media files intact, in this case that you have to restore your phone.

And don’t even get me started with Samsung Kies — one word, UNRELIABLE. In my experience, Samsung Kies did not work half of the time because of drivers not found. This happened to me both in Mac and PC.

This is how it feels like scrolling through a window in Android

For purposes of this illustration, I used a Samsung Galaxy S II (SGS2) running on Android 4.0.3 Ice Cream Sandwich (ICS) and the official Twitter app for Android version 3.2.2.

When Samsung introduced the SGS2 last year, they promised amazing speeds with its 1.2 GHz dual-core processor. But then, obviously, this video is a testament at how hiccups happen brought about more likely by the ever-famous Android UI lag. Look at how the scrolling abruptly stops to open the details of a tweet when you mean it to continue scroll up.

Although I sampled only a single app for this demonstration, it is in fact fairly representative of the whole Android experience — that in Android, the system responds to presses that were never intended in the first place.